De-mining South Sudan The past few decades have been dominated by a vicious civil war in South Sudan. Whilst there has been peace since 2005, the hangover from the war still looms. On the outskirts of Juba, the rapidly expanding city which will soon become the capital of this new nation, those returning to the South after years of conflict are having to share their land with ordinance that caused them to flee. The task of removing mines and unexploded bombs and artillery, that once rained down on this city, is left largely to NGOs from the international community. I spent the day with the Mines Advisory Group, working on a piece for AFP. Jean-Marc’s text can be read here.

De-mining South Sudan

The past few decades have been dominated by a vicious civil war in South Sudan. Whilst there has been peace since 2005, the hangover from the war still looms.

On the outskirts of Juba, the rapidly expanding city which will soon become the capital of this new nation, those returning to the South after years of conflict are having to share their land with ordinance that caused them to flee.

The task of removing mines and unexploded bombs and artillery, that once rained down on this city, is left largely to NGOs from the international community.

I spent the day with the Mines Advisory Group, working on a piece for AFP. Jean-Marc’s text can be read here.