This is Cairo 

 Arriving into one of the world’s most densely populated cities, with a metropolis population of around 18 million people, Cairo assaults the senses. Eyes are constantly trained on the  oncoming traffic , peering through the smog; the nose becomes blocked, black with the  pollution ; car horns & tourist touts banish silence at all hours; one can  taste  the exhaust fumes. 

 But this onslaught is quickly forgotten, the senses become rapidly attuned to Cairo’s charms. The eyes wander to the fantastical Islamic architecture & grand, colonial buildings & gardens; they flitter from the scriptive  Arabic calligraphy  to the painted  portraits  &  graffiti , all interwoven by the  banners  draped across streets. 

 The nose follows the smell of the sweet  shisha  smoke emanating from street-side cafés; in the souk, fresh  garlic  mixes with mint, and  smoked fish ; sweet potatoes  caramelise  in mobile ovens. 

 The muezzin calls echo throughout the city, issued from the hundreds of  mosques , amid the shouts from  souk hawkers  peddling their wares. The clack-clack of domino players rattles through coffee-houses. Greetings of  ahlan wa sahlan  are issued from every shop-front. 

 The tongue craves another  fuul & taameya  sandwich, washed down with a fresh fruit juice, or sweet, minted-tea. 

 So yes, I liked Cairo. 

 A lot.

This is Cairo

Arriving into one of the world’s most densely populated cities, with a metropolis population of around 18 million people, Cairo assaults the senses. Eyes are constantly trained on the oncoming traffic, peering through the smog; the nose becomes blocked, black with the pollution; car horns & tourist touts banish silence at all hours; one can taste the exhaust fumes.

But this onslaught is quickly forgotten, the senses become rapidly attuned to Cairo’s charms. The eyes wander to the fantastical Islamic architecture & grand, colonial buildings & gardens; they flitter from the scriptive Arabic calligraphy to the painted portraits & graffiti, all interwoven by the banners draped across streets.

The nose follows the smell of the sweet shisha smoke emanating from street-side cafés; in the souk, fresh garlic mixes with mint, and smoked fish; sweet potatoes caramelise in mobile ovens.

The muezzin calls echo throughout the city, issued from the hundreds of mosques, amid the shouts from souk hawkers peddling their wares. The clack-clack of domino players rattles through coffee-houses. Greetings of ahlan wa sahlan are issued from every shop-front.

The tongue craves another fuul & taameya sandwich, washed down with a fresh fruit juice, or sweet, minted-tea.

So yes, I liked Cairo.

A lot.